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Presentation Resources: PowerPoint Help - BrightCarbon
I find that Powerpoints help to direct the student's attention. I teach accounting and the real learning experience is actually doing class exercises and student participation. I consider Powerpoints a tool but they do not constitute the learning experience. I agree with Mary Beth Doyle's comment that it's the teaching and learning experience that makes a difference. Encouraging critical thinking, classroom discussion and student participation are some of the key ingredients and Powerpoint or any methodologies should be used only as they contribute to the learning experience.
Does PowerPoint Help or Hinder Student Learning?
I agree. Powerpoint, chalkboard, and overhead are often basically the same tool. i.e. a visual display of information. It's just that powerpoint is "prettier" and is a better way to have things organized ahead of time. The topic should not be whether PowerPoint helps or hinders learning, but rather whether visual displays of information help or hinder learning, and how can these displays be used effectively. The Powerpoint Faq Powerpoint Help | Share The KnownledgeMicrosoft Powerpoint Problem Help!The PowerPoint FAQ site - PowerPoint Help, Hints and How-tos, PowerPoint Answers, Add-Ins and Assists, PowerPoint Tips, Tricks and links to other PowerPoint sites.
I continually seek to improve in ways to engage students, communicate new information, and help students develop skills. Powerpoint can help us achieve these goals but a great powerpoint is not an end in itself. When students are engaged, they may ask tangential questions, debate, hypothesize, or bring in life experiences. When this happens we digress from the Powerpoint or skip ahead to another section. The preplanned organizational structure is not what is most important. However, having quick access to diagrams and videos is helpful. I can offer an example of how PowerPoint encourages passivity. I almost never use PowerPoint in class except when I need to do a demonstration simultaneously and PowerPoint helps me do the two things at once. In the few instances I have used PowerPoint, I asked students for feedback. One student wrote that he loved PowerPoint "because he didn't have to do anything". To me, that is the foundation of the problem. I do have many of my "lectures" put together in PowerPoint (for all the benefits stated for our own organization), but I don't show the PowerPoint to the students. I use PowerPoint extensively in lower division history survey classes, mostly to provide visual supplements to course content: For example, photographs from Ellis Island add value to a class discussion of turn-of-the-century immigration. Slide titles help students organize material, and key terms, dates and properly spelled names are helpful, but should be kept to the minimum. The less text on the screen, the more attention will be given to what's being said in the room. I; try not to put anything on screen that you wouldn't bother to write on the board. The corollary to this is: Students will copy everything on the screen, no mater what you say to them. In upper division classes, I only use PowerPoint occasionally, for maps and illustrations that enrich content. Students tell me that they find PowerPoint helpful. PowerPoint seems particularly suited to history classes, but I wonder if it may not be less help in other disciplines. By the way, a student told me that she made minimal sketches of the PPT screens in her notes, which helped her remember what was being said at the time they were shown. I have passed this on to my classes, and some others have adopted this method. I agree. Powerpoint, chalkboard, and overhead are often basically the same tool. i.e. a visual display of information. It's just that powerpoint is "prettier" and is a better way to have things organized ahead of time. The topic should not be whether PowerPoint helps or hinders learning, but rather whether visual displays of information help or hinder learning, and how can these displays be used effectively. I find that Powerpoints help to direct the student's attention. I teach accounting and the real learning experience is actually doing class exercises and student participation. I consider Powerpoints a tool but they do not constitute the learning experience. I agree with Mary Beth Doyle's comment that it's the teaching and learning experience that makes a difference. Encouraging critical thinking, classroom discussion and student participation are some of the key ingredients and Powerpoint or any methodologies should be used only as they contribute to the learning experience. I use PowerPoint extensively in lower division history survey classes, mostly to provide visual supplements to course content: For example, photographs from Ellis Island add value to a class discussion of turn-of-the-century immigration. Slide titles help students organize material, and key terms, dates and properly spelled names are helpful, but should be kept to the minimum. The less text on the screen, the more attention will be given to what's being said in the room. I; try not to put anything on screen that you wouldn't bother to write on the board. The corollary to this is: Students will copy everything on the screen, no mater what you say to them. In upper division classes, I only use PowerPoint occasionally, for maps and illustrations that enrich content. Students tell me that they find PowerPoint helpful. PowerPoint seems particularly suited to history classes, but I wonder if it may not be less help in other disciplines. By the way, a student told me that she made minimal sketches of the PPT screens in her notes, which helped her remember what was being said at the time they were shown. I have passed this on to my classes, and some others have adopted this method.